Australian Football

AustralianFootball.com Celebrating the history of the great Australian game

 

KEY FACTS

Official name
Wollongong Lions Australian Football Club

Known as
Wollongong Lions

Formed
1971

Colours
Red and white

Emblem
Lions (formerly Swans)

Affiliation (Current)
AFL Sydney (AFLS) 1971–2024

Senior Premierships
Sydney AFL First Division - 2004 (1 total); South Coast AFL Division One - 2016-17 (2 total)

Website
wlions.com.au

Wollongong Lions

Originally known as the Swans, Wollongong Football Club was formed in 1971, and after spending its first four seasons competing in the South Coast Australian Football League went on to become the most successful member of the Illawara Australian Football League claiming a total of eight senior grade flags. In 1989 it crossed to the Sydney Football League, changing its nickname from Swans to Lions in the process. Initially it tended to find success harder to achieve, but in 2004 it won the premiership of the Sydney AFL First Division, thereby securing promotion to the Premier Division for 2005. The 2005 season saw the Lions win 3 of their 16 matches to finish a far from discreditable seventh in a nine team competition. In 2006 they managed one more win, but unfortunately this was only good enough for eighth position on the ladder, and in 2007 the side’s 3-15 record consigned it ninth place in what had become a ten team league. Subsequent seasons brought no further premiership success.

The 2015 season saw the Lions transferring back to their original stamping ground of the South Coast AFL in which they quickly asserted themselves. In 2016 they claimed a premiership by downing local rivals Wollongong Bulldogs by a single point in the grand final. A year later they went back to back when they accounted for Kiama on grand final day by a margin of 15 points, 11.7 (73) to 8.10 (58). The 2018 season brought another grand final clash with Kiama and the Lions were well in contention until quite late on only for the Power to rattle on 4 quick goals and pull away to record a 13 point triumph.

Source

John Devaney - Full Points Publications


 

Footnotes

* Behinds calculated from the 1965 season on.
+ Score at the end of extra time.