Australian Football

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Key Facts

Full name
Richard Condon

Known as
Dick Condon

Born
19 March 1876

Died
27 December 1946 (aged 70)

Age at first & last AFL game
First game: 21y 50d
Last game: 33y 155d

Height and weight
Height: 180 cm
Weight: 72 kg

Senior clubs
Collingwood; Richmond

Jumper numbers
Collingwood: 2

Recruited from
Collingwood (1908)

Dick Condon

ClubLeagueCareer spanGamesGoalsAvgWin %AKIAHBAMKBV
CollingwoodVFA1894-189645140.31
CollingwoodV/AFL1897-1900, 1902-19061491010.6871%0
RichmondV/AFL1908-190932260.8138%0
VFA1894-189645140.31
V/AFL1897-1900, 1902-1906, 1908-19091811270.7065%0
Total1894-1900, 1902-1906, 1908-19092261410.62

AFL: 26th player to appear, 811th most games played, 800th most goals kickedCollingwood: 2nd player to appear, 96th most games played, 86th most goals kickedRichmond: 4th player to appear, 406th most games played, 240th most goals kicked

Dick Condon was a dazzlingly skilful centreman who played a major role in the development of Collingwood's famed 'system', a style of play which was based on extensive use of the then newly invented stab pass. Despite this, Condon was scarcely an archetypal team player, and was frequently involved in altercations with teammates, club officials and umpires. In 1900 he was suspended 'for life' for abusing an umpire, but the penalty was eventually lifted after 18 months. He was captain-coach of Collingwood in 1905-6, but in trademark fashion he managed to upset both his teammates and the club hierarchy, and was shown the door.

After spending the 1907 season umpiring in Tasmania he returned to Victoria the following year and joined fledgling league side Richmond. In 1909, he was appointed coach - much to the disgust of former teammate Charlie Pannam, who resigned from the club in protest - but lasted only a year in the role before becoming such a constant source of irritation to all concerned that he was asked to leave. Condon subsequently moved to New South Wales where he spent the 1910 season coaching East Sydney to a losing Grand Final against YMCA. 

Uniquely among Collingwood's ten-year players, Dick Condon was never made a life member of the club, and a century on it is hard to avoid the impression that here was a troubled soul whose personal deficiencies prevented full expression of what may well have been a unique talent.

Author - John Devaney

Sources

Full Points Footy Publications

Footnotes

* Behinds calculated from the 1965 season on.
+ Score at the end of extra time.